Tuesday, May 2, 2017

Crimson Clover Tea

This past week I drove beside a field where the Crimson Clover blossoms were in full bloom.  It was beautiful.  


It was a large hay field planted with a variety of grasses which will be mowed, dried, and harvested for winter animal feed.  On the other hand, the land could be in crop rotation and soon everything will be plowed under as a green manure to increase the nutrition in the soil.  Either way, you can tell it is not used as a pasture for animals because there is no fence around it.


No fence makes it easy for people like me to slip in and grab a bouquet.  I don't think they will miss what I took. This is foraging, not stealing.


Back in January, I shared my new year's resolution which was to find new teas by growing them in my garden or learning to forage.  Now that it is finally spring, my search has begun.

Crimson Clovers are rich in many nutrients such as calcium, chromium, magnesium, niacin, phosphorus, potassium, thiamine, and vitamin C.  Plus, it is abundant in isoflavones, which is a plant-based chemical that acts like estrogen.

A few of the health benefits from drinking red clover tea:

  • Lowers inflammation, which has been linked to diabetes, cancer, Alzheimer's and more
  • Cleanses the blood by removing toxins from your system
  • Improves water retention which helps creates younger skin
  • Protects against cardiovascular diseases
  • Improves blood flow

There are many more uses; I have only given a short list.



Since I was unsure if the hay field had been treated with chemicals (probably not), I chose to not use these flowers in my tea.  Instead, I picked the leaves from my own itty bitty herb garden.  It is not as impressive as the field above; but, pleases me just the same.

10 comments:

  1. Hi Jeannie,
    This Yankee has never seen that kind of clover. It's stunning! A whole field of it....eye candy.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sally, ya'll come on down to Tennessee and I show you some sights!

      Delete
  2. This is lovely clover and you could tie a bunch together and dry it! It would be lovely in a dried floral arrangement. Thanks for sharing and linking too!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What a good idea. I did not not think about doing that and now it is too late. I put the clovers in a glass vase and put them in the kitchen window so I could enjoy them while washing dishes. The latest storm blew the vase into the sink and crushed the blooms. I drying them would have been wise.

      Delete
  3. Jeannie, I have never seen this kind of clover! Gorgeous! Like you, I would not have made an infusion of it not knowing whether it had been sprayed. It made a beautiful arrangement.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I've never had red clover tea, looks yummy.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So far I have liked almost every tea I have tried. Of course, if you add enough cream and sweetener, anything is good.

      Delete
  5. Ah...now I see the difference in foraging and the other. LOL

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I call it foraging, others call it stealing.

      Delete

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...