Saturday, September 15, 2018

Feathered Neighbors, 2018

View from my kitchen window.
The hummingbirds are once again migrating through my area on their trip to South America.  Each year I welcome them with feeders full of sugar water; they love it.  We have feeders attached to the rail on the deck outside my kitchen window.


This year  "Ping Pong the Great" led the migration in the early spring then left.  He has only returned a few times so I think he has discovered a sweeter flower.  We have missed him but many more have taken his place.  


My nearest neighbor moved: their house and feeders are empty.  It appears all their hummingbirds have migrated to my yard.  To feed the large flock, we have added two more feeders.  This one is hanging on the wall beside the window.  It has a little extra sugar to encourage them to come close.  It isn't the first time I have enticed someone with sweet treats to get what I want.


Peeping Tom.  He is hovering around the kitchen window looking at me demanding the empty feeder be filled.

  
They are always hungry.




The only thing they enjoy more than drinking nectar is fighting amongst themselves. This is their favorite feeder.  The white plastic bee guards were ripped away by the rascally raccoon who was emptying it during the night a few weeks ago.  A plastic net wrapped around the deck rail discouraged him from returning.  Another close neighbor keeps bee hives but they haven't discovered the feeders yet.  If they do, and if they swarm (again), I will buy new guards.


There was an empty spot on the feeder but this naughty hummingbird decided to smack the one sitting, drinking and behaving.  Even though I haven't tried drinking from each separate spout, I have no doubt the syrup tastes the same.





While this one was enjoying the feeder, another hovered a long time behind him.  It was a staring contest.  There was an empty spot on the feeder but neither one would move.



During the daytime, they disappear to enjoy the blooms in my garden and the fields.  When the sun begins to set, all meet at the feeders for one last battle.  They fight, attack, then right before dark sign a truce and everyone sits down for dinner.



They are tanking up to make their long trip south and will be leaving soon.  I will miss them but won't miss constantly filling the feeders.


Additional Links About My Hummingbirds

UPDATE:  A week after this post, my feeders were SWARMED!!!!

"Ping Pong the Great" returned leading the flock.


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13 comments:

  1. I have quite a few hummingbirds that like a certain hardy fuschia that we have in the flowerbed. We get to enjoy them quite often. I have noticed how territorial they are. One time earlier this summer, I was bending over to reach a few berries in the raspberry patch and I felt the brush of tiny wings on my back. That isn't the first time they've dive-bombed me! I guess no one told them that they are really, really little and I'm much larger--a giant really to them. But, they don't care--they want me to leave:).
    You got marvelous pictures of them.

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    1. I have spent this week sitting on the porch taking pictures. They were willing to let me get close but it was my colorful apron they enjoyed more than anything. When I got perfectly still, they would buzz within inches of me. They are loud when there are so many. Some chirp constantly, others say nothing. Bill said it is the females that do the constant chirping and the males who do the dive bombing.

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  2. I’ve never seen so many at one time.....how neat!

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    1. Never have we had so many. I don't know if it is because my neighbors are gone or if they are running from the hurricane. Whatever, I will feed them.

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  3. This is a fascinating sight from your kitchen window. Enviable! To see hummingbirds we would have to go to a zoo and see them in a birdhouse. You can prepare meals while watching these
    flying acrobats. As they are migratory birds, - where will they live in winter?
    Christel

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    1. They are flying south for the winter and will choose a place that is warm. They cannot live here during our cold winters because there aren't any blooming flowers. They are hungry and are emptying my feeders often. They also have good memories and return to the same places every year. We stand at the window and laugh at their antics. It makes dish-washing almost enjoyable. Yesterday Bill saw three at the feeder which is inches from the window feeding at the same time. One had squeezed in between the window and the feeder. He must have really been hungry.

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  4. That's a lot of hummingbirds! I saw some last week at my feeders, up until Thursday. I think they were smart, and headed out before Florence arrived. A good thing, as I can imagine these heavy winds would be tough on such a tiny bird.

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  5. Loved seeing all your beautiful feathered guests : )
    Sort of like grandchildren - wanting to eat sweets, fun-to-watch antics, and fussing with each other!

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  6. I love hummingbirds but my feeders just did not make it through the summer. They were cheap ones and once they fell they were done. I will buy more next spring.

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    1. I recommend getting one with a wide mouth. One of mine is so small not even a toothbrush will fit through the bottle neck. It is impossible to clean it. I am ready for it to go but right now I need all I can get.

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  7. What a lovely Neighbors you got..Sooooo... Beautiful read..

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  8. Wow!! Look at them all !! Pretty amazing....

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