Tuesday, July 4, 2017

Amish, Harvesting Oats


Recently I passed through the Amish Community in Ethridge, Tennessee, and it was oat harvesting time.  Well, I think it was oats.  It was lunchtime and no one was out working in the fields.  This is the machine they use.  I have no idea how it works or how they use it.  Feel free to post any comments if anyone has any information.  I just enjoyed the scenery.

















13 comments:

  1. As far as I know, this machine is an old-fashioned reaper-binder.
    It cuts the crop and ties the stems into bundles.
    Christel

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    1. Thank you Christel! I googled it and you are right, as always.

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  2. Beautiful pictures! There's something about a well maintained farm that strikes a cord....I can't help but think we were meant to work the earth.....

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    1. I agree. I am happiest when I am sitting in the middle of my flowers pulling weeds. Pulling weeds in the vegetable garden is WORK, my flowers are fun.

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  3. I love the pictures. I'm glad someone else knew what the machine was. To me it doesn't look like it would do anything much at all, but I know it does. It's amazing to me what the Amish can do without a tractor! And, it all looks so picturesque.

    I also, have been spending quite a bit of time in the yard and garden, in-between other activities. There is much to be done. I do love it out there during times of the day when it's not too hot. It does seem like the weeds are very prolific this year, as always. I am especially fighting the purslane in the garden. The entire garden was covered with it last summer when we moved in, and every plant seems to have dropped a million or so seeds. Every time we till, or hoe--then water--another large batch of them comes up. If you cut a plant into pieces with your hoe--they all take root. Hmmmm. I'll keep hoeing!

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    1. I have heard purslane is edible? They sell seeds for it in catalogs, but come to think of it, they also sell dandelion seeds. So, have you thought about eating it?

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    2. Someone else told me that they have seen it for sale at farmer's markets, and it is used in juice. I don't know if I like it or not--I actually haven't tried it, but I do know I want the garden space for the veggies I know I like, so, the purslane has to go. If I get brave one day, there will be some for me to try--I'll just have to shut my eyes for 2 minutes, and it will appear:)

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    3. They sell everything green at farmer's markets: that doesn't mean it is worth eating. They also put EVERYTHING in juice: that does not mean it is good either. I vote YOU taste it and do a post about it. I will be glad to read it.

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  4. ...Hi Jeannie, thanks for stopping by. In Rochester, New York's Mount Hope Cemetery James Fraser Gordon (1844-1933), the inventor of the reaper-binder, is buried. My Amish friends used reaper-binders like this. The oats harvest is still a bit off up here, but I hope to see the action soon. I hope that you will stop back again.

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    1. I always enjoy your website "Tom The Backroads Traveller."
      I start looking at pictures and lose track of time.

      http://backroadstraveller.blogspot.com/

      The next time you are driving through Rochester, stop by and take a picture of James Gordon's tombstone. I would love to see it!

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  5. Really wonderful photos. I just loved seeing these oat bales, and the countryside!

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  6. What an interesting drive with the old fashioned way of doing things! I like the photos you took.

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  7. I love visiting Amish country. Very beautiful photos! Thanks for sharing them with SYC.
    hugs,
    Jann

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