Monday, June 19, 2017

My Job, A Typical Day, part 4 of 7

Window inside the school's chapel.
In previous posts, I shared introductions about my odd job.  Now I will show a typical day.  I suppose the only thing I can honestly say about a typical day is that there is no such thing as a typical day. Every setup is different, every place is different and each client wants something different.  There are three constants:  work begins around sunup, finishes late at night and something always breaks.

On the first day in which I carried my camera to record my story, call time was 6:00 am in west Nashville. We pulled out of our driveway at 4:30 am. It was an early morning breakfast award ceremony for students. While we worked, the cafeteria cooked breakfast. Their coffee pot was bottomless.


The event went perfect; however, as usual, it began pouring rain when it was time for load out.  This is Dustin drenched from the deluge.  Waiting for it to stop was not an option since we had another show 30 miles south of Nashville and the schedule was tight.


This is Jim drenched after loading the truck, then watching his windshield wipers break and realizing he has to drive 20 miles north to the shop without them.  We had another event that evening (an additional 30 miles further south) and time was short.  Smiling for the camera was not something he was willing to do.

"Why do windshield wipers only break when it is raining?"
Both Dustin and Reese were soaking wet so we squeezed an hour break into the schedule to drop by Mom's house to use her dryer (thanks Mom).  While there we also raided her refrigerator (thanks again Mom).  

We made it to the evening destination on time, and everything worked out fine.  I will share it in another post.

The next day began with another 6:00 am call in another part of Nashville for a different school's awards ceremony. Since the janitor did not get the memo to let us in early, we were locked out.  Reese began assembling the equipment outside the locked doors because it would be a rushed load in when we finally got in.

Good job Reese.
While Reese began the setup, Dustin helped Jim work on the windshield wipers that had broken the day before.

"It is all gommered up." diagnosed Jim.  


"We need help.  Get the tool kit for the video truck."



"The bushings in the linkage fell apart, jammed the wiper motor and caused it to burn out.  We need to replace the bushings in the linkage and the motor.  Reach into your back pocket and pull out your channel locks."  Jim instructed Dustin.


"What is a channel lock and why would I find one in my back pocket?" asked Dustin.

Jim replied, "This is a channel lock plier and everyone needs to keep one in their back pocket because...."





The detailed instructions continued and were peppered with tales of unbelievable imagination and bravado. 


"Mom, is Uncle Jim teasing me again?" asked Dustin.


"Guys, the janitor is here and has unlocked the doors.  How about putting your toys away and doing some real work." suggested Reese.


The show went well, except for only one breakdown which was a record for us.  Jim ripped the pocket off of his britches.  I suppose if it had been indecent he could have fixed it with Gaff tape.


As the last few details were being finished while we were preparing to leave, phone calls were made to make sure everything would be in order for the afternoon show.

"Hello" said Jim.  "I am looking for the most important person.  Are you the janitor?"


Next I will share what we do if it rains. 

3 comments:

  1. Thank you for sharing at Home Sweet Home!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Sounds like every day is an adventure. Maybe it's the surprises that keep them on their toes. :) Thanks for sharing with SYC.
    hugs,
    Jann

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If "surprises" is a code word for breakdowns, disasters and confusion, well then yes, surprises keeps them on their toes!

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